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Lost River

  • Billy Blackwell 36049

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Billy talks about how the Anishinabe came from the east many, many years ago. The Anishinabe were given dreams of wild rice which guided them eastward until they finally found the lake shown to them in thier dreams. After they found the lake filled with manomin, they came upon an island which a man wore a shirt made of fiber like stuff, like a net. This man war whooped and hollared then disappeared before them. It was then the elders said 'we have found our dream and named the lake 'Nett Lake'.Billy talks about how the Anishinabe came from the east many, many years ago. The Anishinabe were given dreams of wild rice which guided them eastward until they finally found the lake shown to them in thier dreams. After they found the lake filled with manomin, they came upon an island which a man wore a shirt made of fiber like stuff, like a net. This man war whooped and hollared then disappeared before them. It was then the elders said 'we have found our dream and named the lake 'Nett Lake'.

  • Billy Blackwell 36050

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Billy continues with his stories about what he was told about Nett Lake. He talks about how the people used to have to be more self reliant on themselves for survival than we are today. Today there stores that we can go to, to survive but long ago, the people would always carry with them a bag of manomin so they would not starve. Billy talks about how the Anishinabe fought with the Souix that once lived in this area for control over this area. Billy talks about a place known today as Gheen hill and the caves under that hill which used to hide the warriors.This place, Gheen hill. Billy shares his beliefe that this was to be the last battle in this area.Billy continues with his stories about what he was told about Nett Lake. He talks about how the people used to have to be more self reliant on themselves for survival than we are today. Today there stores that we can go to, to survive but long ago, the people would always carry with them a bag of manomin so they would not starve. Billy talks about how the Anishinabe fought with the Souix that once lived in this area for control over this area. Billy talks about a place known today as Gheen hill and the caves under that hill which used to hide the warriors.This place, Gheen hill. Billy shares his beliefe that this was to be the last battle in this area.

  • Jim Gawboy 36051

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Jim gawboy shares a little about who he is and where he is from. Jim has lived in the Vermilion area for about the last 25 years. Jim shares that how the Vermilion residents, of long ago, are those that refused to move to Nett Lake and were allowed to continued to live in the Vermilion area. Jim used to live off the reservation 'as a white person' for many many years. Jim shares how he was continually reminded that he 'was an indian' while working for the Department of Natural Resourse for the State of Minnesota until he retired from that agency. Jim also shares that on the reservation he would be called 'white' because his mother was of Finnish descent.Jim gawboy shares a little about who he is and where he is from. Jim has lived in the Vermilion area for about the last 25 years. Jim shares that how the Vermilion residents, of long ago, are those that refused to move to Nett Lake and were allowed to continued to live in the Vermilion area. Jim used to live off the reservation 'as a white person' for many many years. Jim shares how he was continually reminded that he 'was an indian' while working for the Department of Natural Resourse for the State of Minnesota until he retired from that agency. Jim also shares that on the reservation he would be called 'white' because his mother was of Finnish descent.

  • Bill Latady 36052

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Bill Latady is the curator for the Bios Forte Heritage Museum. Bill shares some of the history and the Treaty of 1854. In 1881 there was a Presidential proclamation which regranted land to the Bois Forte people which was located on Lake Vermilion where people still live today.

  • Bill Latady 36053

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Bill Latady shares some of his historical knowledge regarding the activities of the people which lived in the northern Minnesota area until the early 20 century. Bill shares that about this time is when the Reservations were established and the nomadic life was severly restricted as Band members of the Bois Forte Band were confined to live within the boundaries of the Reservation. Bill shares how this change involved how the people would make a living, from more of gathering food stuffs to getting a job being paid with money in which they bought goods from the store. Bill talks about sacred items such as the traditional drum which are being 'repatriated' and brought back to the museum and other items considered 'sacred or ceremonial items'. Some of these items 'birchbark scrolls' dating back to the early 1900's are some of the items being brought back to the museum.

  • Leah Bowe 36054

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Leah works for the Minnesota Historical Society as 'NAGPRA Coordinator'. Leah shares some hisotry of 'The Crane Lake Cache' which is currently being cared for by the MHS. Leah feels that a problem between Historical Societies and the Tribes is communication. Leah conveys that Bois Forte has been very involved for some time in the repatriation of items considered to be sacred, held by the MHS. The Crane Lake Cache was discovered by some people who were seeking shelter from a storm in a cave located on Crane Lake, Mn and they found about 54 items and took them from the cave.

  • Leah Bowe 36055

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Leah feels that her job is that of a mediator in helping to work with tribes and returning sacred objects to those Tribes. Leah shares that some people from Tribes, were suspicious of her during initial contact in efforts to identify and goes on to describing some of the sensitivity involved with the handling of those items. Leah feels that museums need to listen and take more seriously what the Tribes say and feel about sacred items that those museums have in thier possesion and to work with Tribes in possible repatriation of those items as appropriate.

  • Jane Villebrun 36056

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Anothony Nichols interviews Jane Villebrun about the history of Nett Lake. Jane begins with her recollections of being born in the village of Nett Lake and being raised there. Jane recalls that the Depression did not really affect the families way of living. Her grandpa was in the logging business which along with a garden helped to provide what was needed to get by. Her siblings all chipped in to help with the chores. Jane recalls how thier family wintered in a location refferred to today as 'sugarbush' which is close to Pelican Lake. Jane went to Orr School, which was in the town of Orr, Minnesota. Jane and her family ended up living in the village of Nett Lake where she continues to live today.

  • Jane Villebrun 36057

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Jane describes the house, in sugarbush, as 'one big room'. Jane recalls her grandmother had a way of making things work out, from putting up a cloth on a rope to provide privacy during wash up time to making soap to wash up with. Jane shares a story about a cow that they used to have and chuckles about having to 'shake the jar' to make the butter from the cream collected from thier cow. Jane shares a fond memory of sourdough pancakes and deer meat. Those foods back then did not have all the preservatives that are in the foods today. Jane misses those foods.

  • Harold Goodsky 36058

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harold Goodsky continues with his recollections about Nett Lake. Harold refers to how there used to be 'runners' between the neighboring communitys to deliver news and messages to each other. Harold mentions how Nett Lake did not used to be called Nett Lake but was refered to by the name Bois Forte 'strong bat'. Harold mentions a little about the Midewiiwin system and the Wayah system. Harold includes information about how one used to acquire his name in the old tradtion of the Anishinabe.

  • Harvey Thompson 36059

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harvey begins with his interpretation of how the question 'why is Nett Laked, called Nett Lake', has been answered or relayed to him. Harvey shares information about the island known as 'Spirit Island' and the importance of that island to the people living now in the area.

  • Harvey Thompson 36060

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harvey shares another story about how the lake called Nett Lake was found. People came from an area to the southeast called Hibbing and looked down from a hill that looked like a field. The people called what they found 'food that grows on water'. Harvey continues with information about the island called Spirit Island and the beings that live or are associated with that island. Harvey mentions the 'little people' and mentions a big snake that he had heard storys about.

  • Harvey Thompson 36061

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harvey shares a story about some kids that were walking along the lakeshore and as they looked at a single cloud over Spirit Island, that cloud turned into a big turtle. Harvey continues with his description of what a waaginagaan is, which is a little dome shaped structure and used for different purposes. Harvey shares some knowledge about the Mide. Mide people are keepers of knowledge pertaining to ceremonies and considered sacred among the Anishinabe.

  • Sacred Places 36062

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Donald Chosa talks about netting on Lake Vermilion and how it is such an honor for him to be able to do so. Donald talks about an area that was restricted to netting because this area was associated with a water spirit that used this area. Some of his elders set a net in this area and had negative consequences with thier nets believed to be caused by this water spirit. Donald also talks about a hill in the Vermilion community that was believed to be associated with the spirit of a mountain lion and should be respected.

  • Harold Goodsky 36063

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harold Goodsky shares some information about Spirit Island located on Nett Lake. Harold goes on a little more about the rivers, the rice on the lake, fishing, the timber, blueberries. Harold has an interesting round about way of sharing his recollections.

  • Billy Blackwell 36049

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Billy talks about how the Anishinabe came from the east many, many years ago. The Anishinabe were given dreams of wild rice which guided them eastward until they finally found the lake shown to them in thier dreams.After they found the lake filled with manomin, they came upon an island which a man wore a shirt made of fiber like stuff, like a net. This man war whooped and hollared then disappeared before them. It was then the elders said 'we have found our dream and named the lake 'Nett Lake'.

  • Billy Blackwell 36050

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Billy continues with his stories about what he was told about Nett Lake. He talks about how the people used to have to be more self reliant on themselves for survival than we are today. Today there stores that we can go to, to survive but long ago, the people would always carry with them a bag of manomin so they would not starve. Billy talks about how the Anishinabe fought with the Souix that once lived in this area for control over this area. Billy talks about a place known today as Gheen hill and the caves under that hill which used to hide the warriors.This place, Gheen hill. Billy shares his beliefe that this was to be the last battle in this area.

  • Jim Gawboy 36051

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Jim gawboy shares a little about who he is and where he is from. Jim has lived in the Vermilion area for about the last 25 years. Jim shares that how the Vermilion residents, of long ago, are those that refused to move to Nett Lake and were allowed to continued to live in the Vermilion area. Jim used to live off the reservation 'as a white person' for many many years. Jim shares how he was continually reminded that he 'was an indian' while working for the Department of Natural Resourse for the State of Minnesota until he retired from that agency. Jim also shares that on the reservation he would be called 'white' because his mother was of Finnish descent.

  • Bill Latady 36052

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Bill Latady is the curator for the Bios Forte Heritage Museum. Bill shares some of the history and the Treaty of 1854. In 1881 there was a Presidential proclamation which regranted land to the Bois Forte people which was located on Lake Vermilion where people still live today.

  • Bill Latady 36053

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Bill Latady shares some of his historical knowledge regarding the activities of the people which lived in the northern Minnesota area until the early 20 century. Bill shares that about this time is when the Reservations were established and the nomadic life was severly restricted as Band members of the Bois Forte Band were confined to live within the boundaries of the Reservation. Bill shares how this change involved how the people would make a living, from more of gathering food stuffs to getting a job being paid with money in which they bought goods from the store. Bill talks about sacred items such as the traditional drum which are being 'repatriated' and brought back to the museum and other items considered 'sacred or ceremonial items'. Some of these items 'birchbark scrolls' dating back to the early 1900's are some of the items being brought back to the museum.

  • Leah Bowe 36054

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Leah works for the Minnesota Historical Society as 'NAGPRA Coordinator'. Leah shares some hisotry of 'The Crane Lake Cache' which is currently being cared for by the MHS. Leah feels that a problem between Historical Societies and the Tribes is communication. Leah conveys that Bois Forte has been very involved for some time in the repatriation of items considered to be sacred, held by the MHS. The Crane Lake Cache was discovered by some people who were seeking shelter from a storm in a cave located on Crane Lake, Mn and they found about 54 items and took them from the cave.

  • Leah Bowe 36055

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Leah feels that her job is that of a mediator in helping to work with tribes and returning sacred objects to those Tribes. Leah shares that some people from Tribes, were suspicious of her during initial contact in efforts to identify and goes on to describing some of the sensitivity involved with the handling of those items. Leah feels that museums need to listen and take more seriously what the Tribes say and feel about sacred items that those museums have in thier possesion and to work with Tribes in possible repatriation of those items as appropriate.

  • Jane Villebrun 36056

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Anothony Nichols interviews Jane Villebrun about the history of Nett Lake. Jane begins with her recollections of being born in the village of Nett Lake and being raised there. Jane recalls that the Depression did not really affect the families way of living. Her grandpa was in the logging business which along with a garden helped to provide what was needed to get by. Her siblings all chipped in to help with the chores. Jane recalls how thier family wintered in a location refferred to today as 'sugarbush' which is close to Pelican Lake. Jane went to Orr School, which was in the town of Orr, Minnesota. Jane and her family ended up living in the village of Nett Lake where she continues to live today.

  • Jane Villebrun 36057

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Jane describes the house, in sugarbush, as 'one big room'. Jane recalls her grandmother had a way of making things work out, from putting up a cloth on a rope to provide privacy during wash up time to making soap to wash up with. Jane shares a story about a cow that they used to have and chuckles about having to 'shake the jar' to make the butter from the cream collected from thier cow. Jane shares a fond memory of sourdough pancakes and deer meat. Those foods back then did not have all the preservatives that are in the foods today. Jane misses those foods.

  • Harold Goodsky 36058

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harold Goodsky continues with his recollections about Nett Lake. Harold refers to how there used to be 'runners' between the neighboring communitys to deliver news and messages to each other. Harold mentions how Nett Lake did not used to be called Nett Lake but was refered to by the name Bois Forte 'strong bat'. Harold mentions a little about the Midewiiwin system and the Wayah system. Harold includes information about how one used to acquire his name in the old tradtion of the Anishinabe.

  • Harvey Thompson 36059

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harvey begins with his interpretation of how the question 'why is Nett Laked, called Nett Lake', has been answered or relayed to him. Harvey shares information about the island known as 'Spirit Island' and the importance of that island to the people living now in the area.

  • Harvey Thompson 36060

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harvey shares another story about how the lake called Nett Lake was found. People came from an area to the southeast called Hibbing and looked down from a hill that looked like a field. The people called what they found 'food that grows on water'. Harvey continues with information about the island called Spirit Island and the beings that live or are associated with that island. Harvey mentions the 'little people' and mentions a big snake that he had heard storys about.

  • Harvey Thompson 36061

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harvey shares a story about some kids that were walking along the lakeshore and as they looked at a single cloud over Spirit Island, that cloud turned into a big turtle. Harvey continues with his description of what a waaginagaan is, which is a little dome shaped structure and used for different purposes. Harvey shares some knowledge about the Mide. Mide people are keepers of knowledge pertaining to ceremonies and considered sacred among the Anishinabe.

  • Sacred Places 36062

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Donald Chosa talks about netting on Lake Vermilion and how it is such an honor for him to be able to do so. Donald talks about an area that was restricted to netting because this area was associated with a water spirit that used this area. Some of his elders set a net in this area and had negative consequences with thier nets believed to be caused by this water spirit. Donald also talks about a hill in the Vermilion community that was believed to be associated with the spirit of a mountain lion and should be respected.

  • Harold Goodsky 36063

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 23, 2015

    Harold Goodsky shares some information about Spirit Island located on Nett Lake. Harold goes on a little more about the rivers, the rice on the lake, fishing, the timber, blueberries. Harold has an interesting round about way of sharing his recollections.

  • Billy Blackwell 36040

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Billy tells of how the people of Nett Lake fought with the Souix and of a slain Souix warrior that was reborn as an Ojibwe. This happened with many other bands of Ojibwe in the area. Things began to happen that the Elders told the people that we are no longer supposed to be fighting one another.

  • Lac La Croix Ponies 1 36041

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Donald Chosa tells about the Lac La Croix ponies that used to be in this area and how the ponies almost became extinct. The Bois Forte people used to breed the ponies but the missionaries that came to the area thought it was innappropriate to have the ponies breed in front of children. The missionaries had the herd of ponies, almost numbering a thousand, slaughtered almost to the point of extinction. Today, the ponies have survived through help from a Canadian farm and Donald hopes one day to find the funding to bring some ponies back to the Nett Lake community.

  • Lac La Croix Ponies 2 36042

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Donald Chosa shares some information about beadwork that was repatriated to the band, included some features that looked like horses. Horse hair was also used on the head piece called a roach used by dancers. Donald tells about his roach that he believes is made from the hair of a Lac La Croix Ponie, which he is very proud of to be able to carry and dance with.

  • Nett Lake beginning 36043

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Donald Chosa shares a story he was told about how the people living in the Nett Lake community today, are actually a combination of bands that merged together in the past.

  • Beverly Steel 36044

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Anthony Nichols interviews Beverly Steel about the history of Nett Lake. Beverly talks about how people would come to visit during the rice harvesting times and how glad she was to see her cousins that came during this time as well. Beverly has much respect for the natural resources in and around Nett Lake. Spirit Island, a sacred Island on Nett Lake, is an important place for Beverly.

  • Beverly Steel 36045

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Beverly Steel shares some memories of her youth in Nett Lake. There is a big rock down by the Tribal Government Building and the boys, if they liked a girl, would pick on her. Beverly recalls a game the kids used to play outside called 'aunty aunty I over'. Beverly doesn't think any of the kids today would know about that game because todays youth would rather stay inside with their technology than play outside.

  • Harold Goodsky 36046

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Harold Goodsky begins with how the Ojibwe langauge was corrupted by the new people he refers to as the 'pink people'. Harold mentions how people of various regions such as Vermilion, Nett Lake, Lac La Croix used to think of themselves as one people and used the same langauge. Harold mentions 'why is it called Nett lake? then mentions a man standing on a point waving' the story then transitions to when Harold went into the service.Harold Goodsky begins with how the Ojibwe langauge was corrupted by the new people he refers to as the 'pink people'. Harold mentions how people of various regions such as Vermilion, Nett Lake, Lac La Croix used to think of themselves as one people and used the same langauge. Harold mentions 'why is it called Nett lake? then mentions a man standing on a point waving' the story then transitions to when Harold went into the service.

  • Harold Goodsky 36047

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Harold talks about the various rivers around Nett Lake and how the people used to use the waterways more than walking because of the many swamps around the lake. The Littlefork river was a rich resource for fishing back when he was younger. Harold talks about how people from all over the region would come to the pow wows held in Nett Lake.

  • Harold Goodsky 36048

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Harold Goodsky talks about the Chiefs and sub Chiefs that used to be the leaders of the area. Harold recalls a story about how there were about 17 Chiefs and Sub Chiefs that Harold recalls were invited to Washington (the U.S. Government) for a meeting and while the Chiefs were gone, they cut all the timber, stole it. Harold talks a little about the pow wows that used to be held in Nett Lake and how there used to be runners that delivered messages to other villages about upcoming pow wows.

  • Billy Blackwell 36040

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Billy tells of how the people of Nett Lake fought with the Souix and of a slain Souix warrior that was reborn as an Ojibwe. This happened with many other bands of Ojibwe in the area. Things began to happen that the Elders told the people that we are no longer supposed to be fighting one another.

  • Lac La Croix Ponies 1 36041

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Donald Chosa tells about the Lac La Croix ponies that used to be in this area and how the ponies almost became extinct. The Bois Forte people used to breed the ponies but the missionaries that came to the area thought it was innappropriate to have the ponies breed in front of children. The missionaries had the herd of ponies, almost numbering a thousand, slaughtered almost to the point of extinction. Today, the ponies have survived through help from a Canadian farm and Donald hopes one day to find the funding to bring some ponies back to the Nett Lake community.

  • Lac La Croix Ponies 2 36042

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Donald Chosa shares some information about beadwork that was repatriated to the band, included some features that looked like horses. Horse hair was also used on the head piece called a roach used by dancers. Donald tells about his roach that he believes is made from the hair of a Lac La Croix Ponie, which he is very proud of to be able to carry and dance with.

  • Nett Lake beginning 36043

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Donald Chosa shares a story he was told about how the people living in the Nett Lake community today, are actually a combination of bands that merged together in the past.

  • Beverly Steel 36044

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Anthony Nichols interviews Beverly Steel about the history of Nett Lake. Beverly talks about how people would come to visit during the rice harvesting times and how glad she was to see her cousins that came during this time as well. Beverly has much respect for the natural resources in and around Nett Lake. Spirit Island, a sacred Island on Nett Lake, is an important place for Beverly.

  • Beverly Steel 36045

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Beverly Steel shares some memories of her youth in Nett Lake. There is a big rock down by the Tribal Government Building and the boys, if they liked a girl, would pick on her. Beverly recalls a game the kids used to play outside called 'aunty aunty I over'. Beverly doesn't think any of the kids today would know about that game because todays youth would rather stay inside with their technology than play outside.

  • Harold Goodsky 36046

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Harold Goodsky begins with how the Ojibwe langauge was corrupted by the new people he refers to as the 'pink people'. Harold mentions how people of various regions such as Vermilion, Nett Lake, Lac La Croix used to think of themselves as one people and used the same langauge. Harold mentions 'why is it called Nett lake? then mentions a man standing on a point waving' the story then transitions to when Harold went into the service.

  • Harold Goodsky 36047

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Harold talks about the various rivers around Nett Lake and how the people used to use the waterways more than walking because of the many swamps around the lake. The Littlefork river was a rich resource for fishing back when he was younger. Harold talks about how people from all over the region would come to the pow wows held in Nett Lake.

  • Harold Goodsky 36048

    Lost River

    Production Date: April 15, 2015

    Harold Goodsky talks about the Chiefs and sub Chiefs that used to be the leaders of the area. Harold recalls a story about how there were about 17 Chiefs and Sub Chiefs that Harold recalls were invited to Washington (the U.S. Government) for a meeting and while the Chiefs were gone, they cut all the timber, stole it. Harold talks a little about the pow wows that used to be held in Nett Lake and how there used to be runners that delivered messages to other villages about upcoming pow wows.

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